Exporting

Preparing to trade with the EU and Ireland

Michael Nolan, CEO of the Irish customs clearance solution, Declaron.ie, spoke to us about some of the issues British companies have been encountering trading with the EU, and Ireland in particular, since 1 January and his advice on avoiding them. “It has been a tough 1st Quarter for everyone, with official numbers showing imports from the UK into Ireland down 65% in January of this year. The Free Trade Agreement that was agreed on Christmas Eve 2020 didn’t give businesses enough time to prepare,

New service initiative links China to Liverpool

DKT Allseas (part of Allseas Global Logistics), has announced it will operate a number of supply chain critical container vessel sailings from Shanghai and Ningbo to Liverpool. The first service due to depart Shanghai on 8 April, with two additional sailings towards the end of April. The new initiative by DKT Allseas, is intended to provide relief to customers who are facing increased ocean freight rates, as well as, reduced reliability due to the knock-on impacts of the global pandemic.

Manchester baby business secures major export contract

Family-owned Manchester business Cosatto has secured its first export to Australia in 15 years, shipping £130,000 of its bespoke baby products with the financial support of UK Export Finance (UKEF). The UK and Australia are important economic partners. A new free trade agreement between the two countries would be worth billions of pounds to the UK economy and is close to being signed.

Cosatto already sells to retailers large and small in the UK, and sales to distributors in countries like Japan account for 15% of its growing export business.

It’s a New World, it’s a New Day…

The new year has arrived and with it ushered in a new era for the UK. The protracted flurry of activity towards the end of last year that led to the free trade agreement with the EU, came more with a whimper than with a bang.

So, it is a new world, it is a new day, but are we feeling good?

My sense is that we have been suffering a national hangover that will take time to clear.

The world is a small place

There is a shortage of available 40’ containers in Asia, and as a result transport costs are rising sharply. There are resultant delays, and this robust export demand has the potential to slow down global economic recovery. Also, China has some of the busiest ports in the world and one of the busiest routes is between China and the USA west coast ports. There are so many questions that arise from this, and many lessons to be learned that it is a challenge to know where to start.

How will the potential of WTO trade tariffs affect worldwide shipping?

by Bryn Atherton, Allseas Global Logistics

As trade and commerce continue as normal during the Brexit transition period, many companies who regularly import and export goods with Europe are becoming increasingly concerned about the threat of a ‘no deal’ Brexit. There is plenty of speculation that a free trade agreement between the UK and Europe could yet be achieved. But with discussions still ongoing it’s looking increasingly likely that the UK will revert to WTO trade tariffs from January 2021.

The fog is slowly clearing

The blurry outline of the landscape is emerging. And it has changed, we just don’t yet know exactly how.

When I wrote my last article we were in the very early stages of lockdown, with fear and uncertainty as the prevailing emotions around the world. Since then many parts of the world have come through the first pass of the virus, though some are still in the thick of it. Political strategies have moved from being nationwide to more regional or hyper localised.

Helping independent businesses adapt to new shopping habits

A Manchester haulier is supporting the survival of local businesses by helping firms adapt to selling online. Harbour Freight has assisted independent retailers with setting up a delivery method to reach customers nationwide during the COVID-19 lockdown. The move has enabled local businesses to sell to some of the 89% of UK consumers who have turned to online shopping during the UK lockdown, according to research from Visa, and scale up or down to meet demand. The firm is now ready to support businesses kickstarting operations following the easing of lockdown restrictions and looking for ways to reduce their business costs while accommodating fluctuating sales.

A very unusual birthday for France Line International Transport

They could never have anticipated an anniversary year like this. The Trafford Park-based freight forwarder talks growth, diversification and turning 40 in the midst of the Coronavirus outbreak.

When you’ve been a freight forwarder for 40 years, there’s a lot of history in the rear view mirror. And yet, as France Line International Transport Ltd (known as France Line) celebrates its past, its sights are firmly set on the present and future.

Export origins
The independent European freight forwarder was established in May 1980 by four French hauliers who wanted a sales agent in the UK to provide them with backloads into France.

If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs…

by Tony Goodman MBE.
Well at least we aren’t all worrying about Brexit anymore! The complex situation arising from the Covid-19 global pandemic has caused widespread confusion but has not stopped all trade, and exports are continuing, though they are undoubtedly rapidly slowing. The immediate implication for most businesses is to go into survival mode, changing plans and building contingencies whether their business has been affected or not.

If you have been affected by a slowdown in your business,