Exporting

/Exporting

The fog is slowly clearing

The blurry outline of the landscape is emerging. And it has changed, we just don’t yet know exactly how.

When I wrote my last article we were in the very early stages of lockdown, with fear and uncertainty as the prevailing emotions around the world. Since then many parts of the world have come through the first pass of the virus, though some are still in the thick of it. Political strategies have moved from being nationwide to more regional or hyper localised.

Helping independent businesses adapt to new shopping habits

A Manchester haulier is supporting the survival of local businesses by helping firms adapt to selling online. Harbour Freight has assisted independent retailers with setting up a delivery method to reach customers nationwide during the COVID-19 lockdown. The move has enabled local businesses to sell to some of the 89% of UK consumers who have turned to online shopping during the UK lockdown, according to research from Visa, and scale up or down to meet demand. The firm is now ready to support businesses kickstarting operations following the easing of lockdown restrictions and looking for ways to reduce their business costs while accommodating fluctuating sales.

A very unusual birthday for France Line International Transport

They could never have anticipated an anniversary year like this. The Trafford Park-based freight forwarder talks growth, diversification and turning 40 in the midst of the Coronavirus outbreak.

When you’ve been a freight forwarder for 40 years, there’s a lot of history in the rear view mirror. And yet, as France Line International Transport Ltd (known as France Line) celebrates its past, its sights are firmly set on the present and future.

Export origins
The independent European freight forwarder was established in May 1980 by four French hauliers who wanted a sales agent in the UK to provide them with backloads into France.

If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs…

by Tony Goodman MBE.
Well at least we aren’t all worrying about Brexit anymore! The complex situation arising from the Covid-19 global pandemic has caused widespread confusion but has not stopped all trade, and exports are continuing, though they are undoubtedly rapidly slowing. The immediate implication for most businesses is to go into survival mode, changing plans and building contingencies whether their business has been affected or not.

If you have been affected by a slowdown in your business,

Harbour International Freight joins 700 UK Logistics Businesses to offer Emergency Delivery Service

Manchester-based Harbour International Freight has joined over 700 logistics businesses, all members of the UK’s eight major Pallet networks, to put their combined fleet of 23,500 vehicles at the government’s disposal. In an unprecedented move headed by the Association of Pallet Networks (APN), the networks have joined forces to offer their services for the express distribution of critical emergency and food supplies. Between them they have 30,000 employees, over 750 depots, and offer 100 per cent national coverage by postcode.

And then with one leap, they were free!

So now we know…or do we really?

by Tony Goodman MBE

Whilst we do now have the certainty that we are leaving the EU on 31 January 2020, we will then be entering the 11 month limbo of the transition period up to 31 December 2020. Or is it certain? That is what the UK Government are saying, but the EU are making noises saying that it won’t be possible in that timescale.

Its Groundhog day!

by Tony Goodman MBE

Halloween has passed us by and in spite of promises that we would have finally reached a conclusion, we are still in Brexit limbo. Politicians are out canvassing, knocking on doors like some delayed reaction, continuous loop of trick or treat, whilst every business I have been speaking to simply wants this uncertainty to end. It has reached the point when the uncertainty itself is causing more difficulties than either leaving or staying.

Preparing for Brexit

As we publish this, the UK political landscape has gone through yet another seismic shift, and we seem to be no nearer a clear exit plan for the UK’s departure from the EU. In fact, new legislation has just come in which makes the case for a further extension to the leaving date from 31 October 2019 to 31 January 2020. GM Business Connect caught up with Bryn Atherton, Commercial Director of Allseas Global Logistics, and asked him about what impact Brexit was having on Allseas;

Exporting – Where does it all go?

by Tony Goodman MBE

In the week when we learned that UK exports had risen to a record £647 billion it seems opportune to look at where those exports are going to. With an overall growth of 4% for goods and services, goods alone showed an increase of 4.7% to an annual £357 billion or 55% of the total. This marks a run of 38 consecutive months of export growth on an annual rolling basis. The level of exports as a percentage of GDP still falls woefully behind our European neighbours,

The language of exporting

If you ask companies that export whether they regret it, you will rarely hear any negativity. There is a very good reason for that; exporting helps the bottom line as well as the top line, often more easily than with home sales. This would be obvious if you had a very limited market opportunity because of highly specialised products or services, but it also applies to far more competitive market places. British products have a justifiable reputation for quality, design and innovation and can hold their place across the world.